News from the Universe: NASA Telescope Reveals Largest Batch of Earth-Size, Habitable-Zone Planets Around Single Star
Facilitator(s): Dr. Brandon Lawton (STScI)
Presenter(s): Dr. Sean Carey (IPAC), Dr. Nikole Lewis (STScI), Dr. Robert Hurt (IPAC), Carolyn Slivinski (STScI)

One of the primary goals for the missions that support NASA astrophysics is to answer the question, “are we alone” in the universe. Now, an exciting new result from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope gives us new targets for exploring that question. For this month’s Universe of Learning Science Briefing, we explore the discovery by Spitzer of the first known system of seven Earth-size planets around a single star. Three of these planets are located in an area called the "habitable zone", the area around the star where liquid water is most likely to thrive on a rocky planet. The system sets a new record for most number of habitable zone planets in a stellar system. Furthermore, any of these seven planets could have liquid water, key to life as we know it. Additionally, other NASA astrophysics missions are exploring this system, including Hubble and Kepler, and in the near future, JWST will be able to tell us about the content of the atmospheres of these worlds. Please join us for this briefing where you will have an opportunity to ask questions directly from scientists involved with studying this system, a discussion of the artwork and videos that were created from this discovery, and strategies for engaging your audiences with this news.

Bios:

Dr. Sean Carey is the manager of the Spitzer Science Center, which is part of the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech. “I have been interested in space and astronomy since watching the first lunar landing when I was three. My current day job is coordinating the day to day activities of the Spitzer Science Center, which handles all aspects of science operations with Spitzer from handling the science proposals, to scheduling the observations, through processing the data and providing user documentation and expert support. We are responsible for the calibration of the data and helping astronomers around the world make the best possible use of the infrared images taken. Observing transiting exoplanets is a particular challenge, as we are interested in very small changes (parts per million) in the observed brightness of the host star. I have been lucky enough to help in designing new ways of using Spitzer to characterize planets around other stars. As part of my job, I get to troubleshoot problems with the observatory, which is quite a challenge as Spitzer is now 140 million miles away. For my own personal research, I map our Galaxy in the infrared to help understand where and how stars form, and I help find and characterize planets using Spitzer to study transiting exoplanets and planets detected through microlensing. When I can make it outside, I enjoy playing and coaching soccer.”

Dr. Nikole Lewis is an Assistant Astronomer at STScI. She probes exoplanet atmospheres using a combination of observational and theoretical techniques. She is involved with a number of ground- and space-based observational campaigns aimed at characterizing exoplanet atmospheres. Dr. Lewis is currently the Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at STScI and a member of the formulation science working group for the WFIRST mission. Dr. Lewis received her B.S. in Physics and Mechanical Engineering from Worcester Polytechnic Institute, her M.A. in Astronomy from Boston University, and her Ph.D. in Planetary Sciences from the University of Arizona. She was a Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT before arriving at STScI in 2014.

Dr. Robert Hurt is an astronomer and visualization scientist working at Caltech/IPAC in support of a number of NASA astrophysics missions including the Spitzer Space Telescope, Kepler, WISE, and NuSTAR. His focus is public communication of science through visual representations of data, illustration, and animation.

Carolyn Slivinski is a Community Engagement Specialist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, where she works to connect the informal education community with a wide range of resources. Carolyn first discovered informal education working for a science museum, after beginning her career as an engineer performing spacecraft analyses for a leading satellite manufacturer. She has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Rutgers University.

Women in STEM: Hidden Figures, Modern Figures
Facilitator(s): Jessica Kenney (STScI)
Presenter(s): Kimberly Arcand (Chandra/SAO), Dr. Jedidah Isler (Vanderbilt University), Dr. Cady Coleman (Retired USAF, Former Astronaut), Dr. Julie McEnery (NASA GSFC)

Please join us for this month’s Universe of Learning science briefing as we explore hidden and modern figures of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). Success in these STEM disciplines is not a given for many, especially women and people of color. There are hurdles and obstacles – many unseen and unrecognized – to reach key milestones for those who fall outside the traditional perception and background of what a scientist, technologist, engineer or mathematician should be and where they should come from. The speakers will briefly touch on the state of girls and women in STEM, offer their own career insights, discuss the opportunities presented by the current box office hit “Hidden Figures” and cover free STEM/STEAM programs that can assist your venue in its efforts to affect positive change for girls as they “STEAM ahead with NASA” during Women’s History month and beyond.

Slide presentation:
PDF 7.06 MB
PPT 13.8 MB

Additional resources:
http://nasawavelength.org/list/1642

Bios:

Kimberly Kowal Arcand is the Visualization Lead for NASA’s Chandra X-ray Observatory, which has its headquarters at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory in Cambridge, Massachusetts. Arcand is a leading expert in studying the perception and comprehension of high-energy data visualization across the novice-expert spectrum. As a science data story teller she combines her background in molecular biology and computer science with her current work in the fields of astronomy and physics. She was a nominated "Changemaker" for the White House State of Women Summit in 2016, and recently won the Smithsonian Achievement Award in 2016. Arcand is also an award-winning producer, director and author. She currently serves as President for the Greater Boston Chapter of Federally Employed Women (FEW).

Jedidah Isler is currently a National Science Foundation Astronomy & Astrophysics Postdoctoral Fellow at Vanderbilt University where she studies the physics of particle jets emanating from supermassive black holes at the centers of massive galaxies called blazars. She was recognized as a TED Fellow in 2015 and a National Geographic Emerging Explorer in 2016 for her innovative research and efforts to inspire a new generation of STEM leaders from underrepresented backgrounds. She has been featured in various publications including Vanity Fair, Wired, NPR’s All Things Considered. Her writing has also appeared in the New York Times. Dr. Isler works with schools, museums, libraries, and nonprofit organizations across the country to advance the cause of truly inclusive STEM engagement and has established herself as a champion of access and empowerment in STEM education from middle school and beyond. Most recently, she has been named a TED Senior Fellow to continue to develop and host the monthly web series she founded called “Vanguard: Conversations with Women of Color in STEM.” Read more about Dr. Isler at http://www.jedidahislerphd.com.

Catherine "Cady" Coleman is an American chemist, a former United States Air Force officer, and a former NASA astronaut. A veteran of two Space Shuttle missions, she departed the International Space Station on May 23, 2011, as a crew member of Expedition 27 after logging 159 days in space. Coleman received a bachelor of science degree in chemistry from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1983, and a doctorate in polymer science and engineering from the University of Massachusetts Amherst in 1991 as a member of the Air Force ROTC. In 1988 Coleman entered active duty at Wright-Patterson Air Force Base as a research chemist. During her work she participated as a surface analysis consultant on the NASA Long Duration Exposure Facility experiment. Coleman was selected by NASA in 1992 to join the NASA Astronaut Corps. She retired from the Air Force in 2009 and from NASA in 2016.

Julie McEnery is the Project Scientist for the Fermi gamma-ray Space Telescope and an astrophysicist in the Astrophysics Science Division of NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center. She is an Adjunct Professor of Physics at the University of Maryland, co-Director of the Joint Space Science Institute, Chair of the Division of Astrophysics and a fellow of the American Physical Society. Julie received a BSc in Physics with Astrophysics at the University of Manchester. She received a PhD from University College Dublin. She has also worked at the University of Utah, the University of Wisconsin and Los Alamos National Laboratory.

Jessica Kenney is an Education Outreach Specialist in the Office of Public Outreach at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). She received her Masters in Physics at Fisk University, as part of the Fisk-Vanderbilt Bridge Program. She was introduced to STScI through the Space Astronomy Summer Program (SASP), for which she is now the Program Director. She has been a member of the Office of Public Outreach since 2011 where she works with the Hubble, JWST, and WFIRST education and communications teams, as well as with the broader NASA science education community, to communicate astrophysics content to students, educators, and the general public.

Live! from AAS: The Latest News from NASA Astrophysics Missions
Facilitator(s): Dr. Brandon Lawton (STScI) and James Manning (Universe of Learning)
Presenter(s): Reinout van Weeren (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA) – “Cosmic Double Whammy: Black-Hole Blast Followed by Galaxy Cluster Collision,” Julia Zachary (Wesleyan University) – “Measuring the local ISM along the sight lines of the two Voyager spacecraft with HST/STIS,” Ian Steer (NASA/IPAC Extragalactic Database) – “How Far Away Is that Galaxy: Vast Catalog Has Answers”

This month we have a special edition of the Universe of Learning science briefings! We will be live at the American Astronomical Society meeting in Grapevine, Texas, where scientists will be describing new findings. We’ll provide access to some of the latest news coming out of NASA Astrophysics missions, and tie these results to NASA’s Big Questions:
• How Does the Universe Work?
• How Did We Get Here?
• Are We Alone?

There will be opportunities for you to ask questions directly of those presenting from the AAS meeting.

Slide presentation:
PPT 3.02 MB
PDF 2.59 MB

Additional resources:

Bios:

Dr. Brandon Lawton is an astronomer in the Office of Public Outreach at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). He got his PhD in astronomy at New Mexico State University in 2008, followed by a postdoctoral position at STScI where he used Spitzer Space Telescope data to explore star formation in our neighboring galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds. Dr. Lawton has been a member of the Office of Public Outreach since 2011 where he works with the Hubble, JWST, and WFIRST education and communications teams, as well as with the broader NASA science education community, to deliver accurate cutting-edge science content to students, educators, and the general public.

Jim Manning is a science education consultant with long experience as a planetarium director, including in a museum setting. Most recently, he has served as head of the Office of Public Outreach at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, and as Executive Director of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific in San Francisco. He’s a past president of the International Planetarium Society, and has been Principal Investigator or Co-PI for a number of NASA-funded and NSF-funded programs in informal science education. He currently consults for the Universe of Learning program.

New Worlds: NASA’s Search for Exoplanets
Facilitator(s): Dr. Brandon Lawton (STScI)
Presenter(s): Dr. Nikole Lewis (STScI), Dr. Stephen Rinehart (NASA GSFC), Mary Dussault (Harvard-Smithsonian CfA), Dr. Kevin Stevenson (STScI)

Please join us for this month’s Universe of Learning science briefing as we explore how several NASA astrophysics missions are leading the effort to answer the age-old question: Are we alone? Scientists have discovered thousands of new worlds, dubbed exoplanets, orbiting around other stars or, in some cases, traveling alone through space without a stellar host. During this briefing, exoplanet experts working on NASA exoplanet missions will explain how astronomers go about finding these alien worlds. The current census of exoplanets will be described, as well as the future of exoplanet detecting missions within NASA. For those seeking an authentic experience of searching for exoplanets, we will also introduce an interactive activity where the general public can use a robotic telescope to detect exoplanets using the same techniques as professional astronomers.

Bios:

Dr. Nikole Lewis is an Assistant Astronomer at STScI. She probes exoplanet atmospheres using a combination of observational and theoretical techniques. She is involved with a number of ground- and space-based observational campaigns aimed at characterizing exoplanet atmospheres. Dr. Lewis is currently the Project Scientist for the James Webb Space Telescope at STScI and a member of the formulation science working group for the WFIRST mission. Dr. Lewis received her B.S. in Physics and Mechanical Engineering for Worcester Polytechnic Institute, her M.A. in Astronomy from Boston University, and her Ph.D. in Planetary Sciences from the University of Arizona. She was a Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at MIT before arriving at STScI in 2014.

Dr. Stephen Rinehart is an Astrophysicist at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC). His science interests include star formation, stellar evolution, and exoplanets. To pursue this research, Dr. Rinehart has helped design, build, and test instrumentation for space telescopes. He is currently the Project Scientist for the Transiting Exoplanet Survey Satellite (TESS), an Explorer mission designed to search for exoplanets around bright, nearby stars. He previously served as the Associate Project Scientist for the Hubble Space Telescope during Servicing Mission 4. Dr. Rinehart also helps develop concepts for future space science missions, particularly for infrared astrophysics and interferometry. He is the Principal Investigator for the Balloon Experimental Twin Telescope for Infrared Interferometry (BETTII), a novel new experiment designed to explore the earliest stages of star formation and to pave the technological path for future space observatories. Dr. Rinehart received his B.S. in Physics from MIT, and his M.S. and Ph.D. in Physics from Cornell University. He has been at NASA since 2004. Dr. Rinehart lives just outside Washington D.C. with his wife Dr. Aki Roberge, a NASA astronomer in the Exoplanets and Stellar Astrophysics Laboratory, their 5-year old daughter Hoshi, and their dog Charley.

Mary Dussault is an Instructional Systems Specialist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) where she directs a number of national astronomy and physical science education and outreach projects funded by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Smithsonian Institution, and various foundations. Through her exhibition and education program development work at the CfA, and her prior work at Boston's Museum of Science, Dussault has over 30 years of experience researching and developing inquiry-based science learning experiences for a variety of settings: designed spaces and informal learning environments, for the classroom, and for teacher professional-development programs. She earned her Bachelor's degree in Astronomy from Wellesley College, and a Master's degree in History of Science from the Harvard University Extension School.

Dr. Kevin Stevenson is an ESA/AURA Research Astronomer at STScI. He is interested in characterizing the architectures and atmospheres of extrasolar planets and developing a classification scheme to better understand their nature and origin. To achieve this goal, he uses ground- and space-based telescopes to determine the orbits, compositions, and chemical properties of transiting exoplanets as they pass in front of or behind their parent stars. Dr. Stevenson received his B.S. in Physics at Simon Fraser University, his Masters in Astronomy from the University of Western Ontario, and his Ph.D. in Physics/Planetary Sciences from the University of Central Florida. He was a Sagan Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of Chicago before arriving at STScI in mid-2016.

Frontier Fields: NASA's Great Observatories Team Up to View the Distant Universe
Facilitator(s): Dr. Brandon Lawton (STScI)
Presenter(s): Dr. Jennifer Lotz (Space Telescope Science Institute), Dr. Peter Capak (Infrared Processing and Analysis Center – IPAC), and Dr. Georgiana Ogrean (Stanford)

Images of the distant universe, called deep fields, allows for the study of galaxies throughout the history of the universe. NASA’s Frontier Fields is a program to capture twelve new deep-field images across the electromagnetic spectrum, from X-rays to infrared light. NASA’s Great Observatories — the Hubble Space Telescope, Spitzer Space Telescope, and Chandra X-ray Observatory — are taking the lead on this ambitious effort. From the study of the interactions between galaxies and galaxy clusters to using the mass of the clusters to lens and magnify distant background galaxies at the edge of the observable universe, the multi-year Frontier Fields program promises to greatly enhance our understanding of how galaxies and clusters of galaxies evolve with time. In addition to the six galaxy cluster fields, the Frontier Fields includes six deep blank fields – akin to the famous Hubble Ultra Deep Field – to better understand the nature of galaxies across a wider swath of the sky. The results of the Frontier Fields will not only provide better views of galaxy evolution and merging galaxy clusters, but it will also provide a better understanding of the physics of the cosmos. The expected enhancements to our understanding of how galaxies are created and change with time will greatly impact the science return of future missions, such as those by the James Webb Space Telescope. For this professional learning briefing, three astronomers working on the Great Observatories Frontier Fields campaign will provide updates on the program and highlight new discoveries. In addition, supplementary resources will be highlighted.

Slide presentation:
PPT Format 16.6 MB
PDF Format 6.41 MB

Additional resources:
http://nasawavelength.org/list/1581

Bios:

Dr. Jennifer Lotz was born in Boulder, Colorado and graduated from high school in Carlisle, Pennsylvania. She received her bachelor of the arts degree in physics and astronomy from Bryn Mawr College in Pennsylvania and completed her doctorate in astrophysics at John Hopkins University in Baltimore, Maryland, in 2003. As a postdoctoral fellow, she worked at the University of California, Santa Cruz and was a Leo Goldberg Fellow at the National Optical Astronomy Observatory. She is currently an associate astronomer at the Space Telescope Science Institute, working on preparations for the James Webb Space Telescope. She is the Principal Investigator of the Hubble Frontier Fields.

Dr. Peter Capak received a Bachelor’s of Science in Physics and Astronomy from the University of British Columbia in Vancouver, and a Masters and Ph.D. in Astronomy from the University of Hawaii, where he made contributions to the first generation of multi-wavelength galaxy surveys. He was a postdoc at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) where he helped make the first 3-dimensional maps of dark matter in the universe using weak gravitational lensing. Dr. Capak is currently an Associate Research Scientist at the Caltech Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) where his research focuses on the formation of the first galaxies and measurements of dark energy using gravitational lensing. Dr. Capak is also the lead of the international COSMOS collaboration and Principal Investigator for several large Spitzer programs including: the Spitzer Large Area Survey with Hyper-Suprime-Cam (SPLAH) and the Spitzer-Euclid-WFIRST legacy survey. In addition, he is a leading member of the European Space Agency Euclid cosmology mission and the wide-field infrared survey telescope (WFIRST) cosmology science investigation team.

Dr. Georgiana Ogrean is a Hubble Postdoctoral Fellow at Stanford University, where she studies particle acceleration by shocks in merging clusters of galaxies. Prior to coming to Stanford, she was a Hubble Fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She obtained her PhD in 2014 from University of Hamburg, Germany.

Our Home, the Milky Way Galaxy
Facilitator(s): Dr. Brandon Lawton (Space Telescope Science Institute)
Presenter(s): Dr. Sean Carey (IPAC); Dr. Dan Patnaude (CfA); Dr. Jessie Christiansen (IPAC); Dr. Seth Digel (SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory)

Astronomers now know that there are hundreds of billions of galaxies in the observable universe. Humans have been observing one of those galaxies for millennia — our home, the Milky Way galaxy. People looking up at the night sky will notice that the sky looks quiet, peaceful, and unchanging. But if we look closer, we get a very different impression. NASA telescopes allow us to take that closer look into our galaxy. We've found a bustling metropolis full of activity, change, and renewal. In this Universe of Learning briefing, astronomers from across a multitude of NASA Astrophysics missions will describe how NASA's fleet of telescopes are working together to understand our home galaxy, including the structure of the Milky Way, star formation, stellar death, frequency and characteristics of exoplanets, and the enigmatic center where a supermassive black hole resides. In addition, we will point to some additional resources about the Milky Way galaxy developed by the NASA Astrophysics missions.

Slide presentation:
PDF Format 3.91 MB
PPT Format 17.2 MB

Additional resources:
http://nasawavelength.org/list/1497

Bios:

Sean Carey is the IRAC instrument support team lead at the Spitzer Science Center, part of the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center (IPAC) at Caltech. He has been interested in space and astronomy since watching the first lunar landing when he was three. His current day job is leading the team that enables the science coming from the Infrared Array Camera (IRAC) aboard the Spitzer Space Telescope. They are responsible for the calibration and processing of the data and helping astronomers around the world make the best possible use of the infrared images taken. Observing transiting exoplanets is a particular challenge as they are interested in very small changes (parts per million) in the observed brightness of the host star. Sean has been lucky enough to help in designing new ways of using Spitzer to characterize planets around other stars. As part of his job, he troubleshoots problems with the observatory, which is quite a challenge as Spitzer is now 140 million miles away. For his own personal research, he maps our galaxy in the infrared to help understand where and how stars form, and he helps find and characterize planets using Spitzer to study transiting exoplanets and planets detected through microlensing. When he can make it outside, he enjoys playing and coaching soccer.

Dan Patnaude is a staff astrophysicist for the Chandra X-ray Center, located at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Dan plays a key role in daily operations and science mission planning for the Chandra X-ray Telescope, one of NASA's Great Observatories. His research interests include supernovae and their remnants, and in particular, how supernova remnants can inform us about the end-stages of stellar evolution. Prior to his current position, Dan was a postdoctoral fellow at the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory. Dan received his PhD in Physics and Astronomy from Dartmouth College in 2005, and his B.S. in Astronomy from the University of Massachusetts in 1995.

Jessie Christiansen is a staff scientist at the NASA Exoplanet Science Institute, and science curator at the NASA Exoplanet Archive. She is involved in the discovery and characterization of extrasolar planets via the NASA Kepler/K2 mission, paying specific attention to measuring how common Earth-like planets might be throughout the Milky Way. She is also involved in the planning for the upcoming NASA TESS mission, which will search the whole sky for the nearest planets to Earth. Prior to her current role, Jessie was a staff scientist with the NASA Kepler mission at the NASA Ames Research Center, and prior to that was a postdoctoral research fellow at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. She received her PhD in 2008 from the University of New South Wales, and her Bachelor of Science (Hons) from the Australian National University.

Seth Digel is a senior experimental physicist in the Kavli Institute for Particle Astrophysics and Cosmology at the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory. He is a member of the Large Area Telescope (LAT) collaboration for the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope and has studied the diffuse gamma-ray emission of the Milky Way and the populations of gamma-ray sources that the LAT has detected. He is also a member of Dark Energy Science Collaboration and the Camera project for the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope. He received a PhD in 1991 from Harvard University and his BS in Physics from the University of Delaware.

Brandon Lawton is an astronomer in the Office of Public Outreach at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI), where he works as an Education and Outreach Scientist. Dr. Lawton works with the Hubble, JWST, and WFIRST outreach and communications teams, as well as with the broader NASA science education community, to deliver accurate cutting-edge science content to students, educators, and the general public.

Exploring the Universe with NASA's Astrophysics Missions: An Introduction to the Universe of Learning
Presenter(s): Presenters: Carolyn Slivinski, Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI); Mary Dussault, Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA); Brandon Lawton, Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)

How does the universe work? How did we get here? Are we alone? These are the big questions NASA astrophysics missions are addressing. Come join us for a kick-off of a new series of professional development astrophysics telecons by NASA's Universe of Learning, which is a new, integrated astrophysics STEM learning and literacy program. The goal of this program is to advance STEM learning and literacy by creating and delivering a unified suite of education products, programs, and professional development that spans the full spectrum of NASA Astrophysics. For this pilot briefing, we will introduce NASA's Universe of Learning and spotlight how NASA's astrophysics missions are working together to make discoveries related to the physics of the cosmos, cosmic origins, and exoplanet exploration. We also want to hear from you! We will provide opportunities for feedback on how our science briefings can help you better understand current astrophysics science and how we can best connect you to the NASA astrophysics resources that are useful to you.

Slide presentation:
PDF Format 1.23 MB
PPT Format 3.71 MB

Additional resources:
http://nasawavelength.org/list/1478

Bios:

Carolyn Slivinski is an Education Specialist at the Space Telescope Science Institute in Baltimore, MD, where she works to connect the informal education community with a wide range of resources. Carolyn first discovered informal education working for a science museum, after beginning her career as an engineer performing spacecraft analyses for a leading satellite manufacturer. She has a BS in Mechanical Engineering from Rutgers University.

Mary Dussault is an Instructional Systems Specialist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) where she directs a number of national astronomy and physical science education and outreach projects funded by NASA, the National Science Foundation (NSF), the Smithsonian Institution, and various foundations. Through her exhibition and education program development work at the CfA, and her prior work at Boston's Museum of Science, Dussault has over 30 years of experience researching and developing inquiry-based science learning experiences for a variety of settings: designed spaces and informal learning environments, for the classroom, and for teacher professional-development programs. She earned her Bachelor's degree in Astronomy from Wellesley College, and a Master's degree in History of Science from the Harvard University Extension School.

Dr. Brandon Lawton is an astronomer in the Office of Public Outreach at the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI). He got his PhD in astronomy at New Mexico State University in 2008, followed by a postdoctoral position at STScI where he used Spitzer Space Telescope data to explore star formation in our neighboring galaxies, the Magellanic Clouds. Dr. Lawton, a member of the Office of Public Outreach since 2011, works with the Hubble, JWST, and WFIRST education and communications teams, as well as with the broader NASA science education community to deliver accurate cutting-edge science content to students, educators, and the general public.